Article 99 + Q&A and VIP reception

Join CinemaKC at the Screenland Medallion Theatre at Plexpod on Friday, November 9 for a special screening of the KC-set, post-Vietnam thriller. Click here for tickets and info.

Episode One: Meagan Flynn, Jennifer Friend, Timothy Friend, Kelsey Amara and Dotty Hamilton

Learn about K.C. Women in Film & TV and the Kansas In ternational Film Festival. Plus, watch a short about how a quest for perfection threaten s a chance for happiness and two shorts with distinctive visual styles.

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Episode Five: Stuart Bury and Ryan Tonner

Kansas City Art Institute alumni prove why the school’s reputation for having a top-notch animation program is well earned – even producing an Oscar-winning short.

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Episode Thirteen: Don Maxwell

Writer Ambrose Bierce’s short stories about the Civil War inspired a trilogy of films, one of which is directed by this KC filmmaker.

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Episode Ten: Jeff East

This Superman of an actor soars in Patrick Rea’s comic thriller.

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Episode Three: Brandon Green, Vickie Rocco, Sergio D. Acosta, Jenny Phillips and Grace Powell

Powerful documentaries focus on life after prostitution, the glories of tattoos, and
transgendered teens. Plus, a local producer/actor discusses filmmaking in K.C. and L.A.

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Episode Nine: Pete Whitehead, Paul Horton and Peter Martin

We showcase talented Hallmark animators, both in the studio and on location at the beloved Kansas City-based company.

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Episode Three: Todd Norris

The Emmy-award winning director and cinematographer shares films showing that he can master any genre.

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Episode Nine: Stephen Goldblatt and Jeff Beith

Find out why Bazillion is valued for its visual creativity.

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Episode Fourteen: Patrick Rea – Part Three

See what’s in this filmmaker’s garden of unearthly delights.

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Episode Five: W. David Keith, Maxwell W. Putnam, and Colin Ross

A local producer works with Michael McMillian on his Futurestakes webisode about a teen-age boy in danger. And two teen filmmakers show cinematic creativity knows no age limit.

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CinemaKC Legacy Series & KC Film Office Present Gary Sinise in “Truman”

By Patricia Hamarstrom Williams | February 25th, 2019

Wednesday, May 8 at 7:00p.m. at The Pharaoh, 114 W Maple Ave, Independence, MO 64050 VIP Party at 5:30p.m. at Ophelia’s, 201 N Main St, Independence, MO 64050

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Kansas City FilmFest International & KC Film Present “Ride with the Devil”

By Patricia Hamarstrom Williams | February 25th, 2019

Sponsored by CinemaKC Legacy Series and KC Film Office/Visit KC Thursday, April 11 at Cinemark on the Country Club Plaza Screening 7:00p.m. – 9:30p.m.    –    Q&A 9:30p.m.   –     VIP Party 5:45p.m. – 6:45p.m. CinemaKC Legacy Series Award presented at 6:15p.m. during VIP Party

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“Article 99”

By Patricia Hamarstrom Williams | October 5th, 2018

CLICK HERE: Plot and Description at Wikipedia BUY TICKETS

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REVIEW: ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom,’ empire of the senseless

By Johnny Szlauderbach

  When Steven Spielberg unleashed Jurassic Park exactly a quarter century ago, the wunderkind responsible for the ur-blockbuster finally synthesized the apex summer tentpole. The material was junk, but Spielberg transformed Michael Crichton’s schlocky, pseudoscientific tome into a featherweight behemoth of all-ages movie magic. Other, more interesting directors were considered; imagine the cruel splatter-fest Gremlins’s…

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REVIEW: ‘Hereditary,’ genetic disorder

By Johnny Szlauderbach

  Psycho birthed the modern horror genre and, quite appropriately, fractured it in two: the shrewd and the artful. Shameless about their own junkiness, the former function explicitly as thrill rides (The Shining, The Conjuring); the latter harbor transcendent ambitions, couching their frights in atmosphere and metaphor (The Innocents, It Follows). There’s some crossover, of…

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REVIEW: ‘Isle of Dogs,’ elements of style

By Johnny Szlauderbach

  It’s easy to read a kind of progression into each new Wes Anderson movie. The last two have seen Anderson retreat even further from a recognizable reality and deeper into his own obsessively appointed imagination while, for the first time, invoking something bigger than the emotional immaturity of privileged men.   The amorphousness of…

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